On 2014-01-05, I joined the mobileread forum. At that time, I just started to work on automated EPUB generators for texts in general and therefore appreciated that the people on the mobileread forum wasn’t entirely reader centered, but had also a fair share of technical discussion going on.

On 2015-04-03, somebody called Ranwhp asked in the German section of mobileread forums if there is a way to download all German titles of the Patricia Clark Memorial Library at once, which led me to look into it. The Patricia Clark Memorial Library is a collection of e-books uploaded by mobileread members and hosted by the mobileread operators. Patricia Clark was one of the uploaders which passed away, and in memory of her, the collection was named after her. The collection has no real stewardship nor curation except what’s required by law and forum rules, which is why I would hesitate to call it a library. The individual uploaders take care of their own uploads only as long as they’re still interested in them and the licenses vary from Public Domain over Creative Commons BY-SA-NC (nonfree) to all rights reserved and used on mobileread with special, non-transferable permission, rendering the work of the contributors and the collection as a whole pretty useless for anything other than personal entertainment.

For a downloader tool, such considerations were irrelevant, of course, so I started to develop one in order to help out Ranwhp and save him from hours of manually downloading every single file. I myself did not have an interest in the ebooks themselves as I mostly do not read for entertainment purposes, I was primarily motivated by experimenting with client programming and EPUBs as found in the wild, to automatically read and transform them with code. The high quality of the XHTML page source code generated by mobileread’s forum software made it quite easy to follow the links and retrieve the actual ebooks, which is a good thing.

On 2015-05-01, I released the first version of my mobileread_wiki_ebook_list_downloader1 (md5sum eff1b8a28a0a9af8f6d5982cf7150ca8). In my post from that day, I pointed out that automatic downloads could be considered to be a denial-of-service attack and conflicting with the mobileread terms of use, which I tried to avoid right from the beginning by an enormous delay of 5 seconds between each download, making the client a very friendly, cooperating client in contrast to some rogue crawlers out there on the web. As far as I can tell, this was perfectly well for mobileread staff.

On 2015-05-11, Ranwhp provided his report on running my client: after 10 hours and 52 minutes, a total of 2728 files were downloaded with a zipped size of 1.8 Gigabyte. One day later, Ranwhp posted a link to Google drive where it was possible to download the Zip archive, which on one hand did not consider the legal obligations of the restrictive licensing of many titles from that collection, while on the other hand such an archive would save a lot of bandwith and server resources for mobileread. I immediately notified Ranwhp about the legal problems which might come with some of the ebooks, and he disabled the download link shortly thereafter. Until this point, no other member of the forum joined our conversation, and as they did, they raised concerns about the legal status in a friendly manner at first. Because of undiplomatic answers, lack of knowledge about copyright law and the assumption that the Patricia Clark Memorial Library would be 100% in the Public Domain, things escalated quickly, as uploaders saw their rights violated. What followed was a long conversation about why a local, full copy of the library would make sense and about the legal status of the collection, which are strange questions to discuss on a website about electronic reading. Some posts were quite constructive, other authors made clear that their approach towards media is set up in a way that prevents everything else from happening.

This incident with the uploaders however didn’t affect the downloader software at all, so I continued development and started other controversial threads about the technical quality of the collection. Then, for a long time, silence. On 2016-09-29, Ranwhp revived the original thread and published a link to MR-eBook-Downloader, another downloader for German titles of the mobileread collection. Again, I immediately mentioned that the developer of this tool should better have a delay in place between each download, so mobileread server resources won’t get used excessively. One day later, the entire thread was deleted without any explaination.

I asked mobileread staff to provide an explaination or to restore the thread, but until now I did not receive an answer. Therefore I decided today to leave mobileread and not look at their stuff again. I’m not angry or something, it’s more that I’m utterly confused about what happened to that thread after all this time, and I don’t like that my time invested into posting goes to waste within the blink of an eye. For me, this is another glaring example for the broken web we inhabit, and that technology can never be better than what the mentality of people is prepared to allow it to be.

Brother MFC-J4420DW

Der Brother MFC-J4420DW hat zwar einen Anschluss, mit welchem man von einem USB-Stick drucken kann, jedoch ist dieser leider von geringem Nutzen, weil die Brother-Software nicht in der Lage ist, auch PDFs vom Stick zu drucken, sondern nur Bildformate. Dies ist insbesondere deshalb nicht nachvollziehbar, weil der Drucker aus anderen Quellen problemlos PDFs drucken kann. Es existiert überdies die Funktion, dass der Scanner auf den USB-Stick scannt und das Scan-Ergebnis im PDF-Format ablegt. Da Brother für dieses Modell keinen frei lizenzierten Linux-Treiber bereitzustellen scheint, bleibt mir nur noch die Option, extra einen WLAN-Hotspot einzurichten, mit dem sich der Drucker dann hoffentlich verbinden und PDFs drucken kann – völlig unnötiger Overkill, einen WLAN-Hotspot nur für diesen Zweck betreiben zu müssen. Von Brother gibt es auf Anfrage keine Antwort, eigentlich wäre aber ein Firmware-Update angebracht, welches diese Funktionalität nachrüstet. Sonst ist dieses Gerät aus meiner Sicht ein Rückgabe-Kandidat.

Brother äußert sich auf Anfrage nicht, wie es dazu kommen konnte oder ob Abhilfe geschaffen wird.

Intro – Warum dieser Blog?

Weil ich Christ bin, bin ich früher immer in eine Gemeinde/Kirche gegangen. An einem Tag hat die Gemeinde Volker Kauder eingeladen, um über die Verfolgung von Christen zu sprechen. Volker Kauder ist der Chef der Parteien CDU/CSU im Bundestag. Über die Verfolgung von Christen spricht Volker Kauder, weil er und die CDU/CSU viele Wähler hat, die in eine Gemeinde/Kirche gehen.

Wenn er nicht über die Verfolgung von Christen spricht, damit seine Wähler ihn gut finden, möchte er Menschen im Irak töten lassen – das ist illegal und verboten. Er sagt, der IS/Daesh ist in Syrien gestartet – das ist nicht richtig. Er findet gut, dass die USA Krieg machen. Volker Kauder findet Krieg und Waffen gut, weil die CDU in seinem Wahlkreis von der Firma Heckler&Koch Geld bekommt. Weil die CDU Geld von Heckler&Koch bekommt, probiert Volker Kauder in der Politik, dass das deutsche Militär bei Heckler&Koch Waffen einkauft. Volker Kauder ist egal, dass die Waffen von Heckler&Koch nicht richtig funktionieren, weil seine CDU-Partei von Heckler&Koch Geld bekommt. Volker Kauder ist egal, dass die Waffen von Heckler&Koch ohne Kontrolle in der Türkei, Myanmar, dem Iran, dem Irak, Pakistan, Saudi-Arabien, Thailand, Mexiko, Malaysia und Ägypten produziert, benutzt und verkauft werden [1, 2]. In diesen Ländern gibt es Krieg, Kriminalität und die Verfolgung von Christen.

Mit Jesus Christus hat das nichts zu tun. Ich gehe nicht mehr in diese Gemeinde, weil die Gemeinde keine Politik machen soll. Eine christliche Gemeinde darf keine Werbung für Volker Kauder oder die CDU/CSU machen. Jetzt helfe ich Flüchtlingen, weil Volker Kauder den Menschen nicht hilft.